Sedimentary, My Dear Watson

A 21-year-old geology (and Spanish and history) undergrad who loves rocks and wants other people to love them too! Here you'll find a diverse collection of all things geo and natural history related, targeted at varying levels of expertise.

*Please feel free to send in geo-related questions to the ASK page!*

Topics in Structural Geology

Geology graduate programs?

I’m about to finish my final year of undergraduate, and I’m planning on going on to earn my Master’s degree in geology once I graduate.

I’m just now starting to look at grad schools, but there’s just so many options.

Does anyone have recommendations for really good geology graduate programs?

I know for sure that I do not want to go into petroleum or natural gas, but otherwise I’m pretty open. [I’m probably most interested in geologic hazards]

I’m based out of the Midwest, but options anywhere in the contiguous U.S. would be excellent!

Beryl crystals in pegmatite
Image by author

Beryl crystals in pegmatite

Image by author

Specimens from American Museum of Natural History - NYC
Image by author

Specimens from American Museum of Natural History - NYC

Image by author

Super happy with my new poster!

Every time I would go to the Field Museum in Chicago, I’d always look for this poster but it would always be the /one/ that was out of stock. 

Last week I went to the American Museum of Natural History in NYC, and they actually had this poster in stock there!

I was super excited, and now it gets to grace my dorm room here in Wisconsin. My very long poster quest has ended!

Super happy with my new poster!

Every time I would go to the Field Museum in Chicago, I’d always look for this poster but it would always be the /one/ that was out of stock.

Last week I went to the American Museum of Natural History in NYC, and they actually had this poster in stock there!

I was super excited, and now it gets to grace my dorm room here in Wisconsin. My very long poster quest has ended!

Terms to Know!

Relevant for structure and mapping

earthstory:

Giant hole appears in ground in RussiaThis is an 80-meter (262 feet) in diameter hole in the ground that appeared in a remote area of Russia. At present, no one knows exactly how it formed. It’s so remote that however it formed, there were no people around to see it; it is only now being investigated by a team of visiting scientists.Head over to this post (Video) and we’ve got video taken from a helicopter flying over the hole up now.
There are some obvious options but none of them are a perfect fit. A meteor strike does create a hole in the ground, but this doesn’t have the typical shape of a meteor crater; it seems much deeper. Volcanic craters do exist but this doesn’t seem like a volcanic area. Interactions between magma and groundwater can create explosion craters that look a lot like this, but again not sure where the Magma would be coming from in this remote area of Siberia.Some suggestions that could make sense involve a meteor actually hitting an area where there is an open pocket of space created from previous erosion and punching through, or the one I think might be the most likely; a gas explosion.This area is full of natural gas resources and this site is only 30 kilometers from the region’s biggest natural gas field. An explosion of natural gas, potentially being released by melting permafrost, makes sense to me, but I’ll be interested to see if there’s a final answer.-JBBMore:http://blog.seattlepi.com/bigscience/2014/07/16/mystery-crater-in-siberia-has-scientists-stumped-for-now/#23627101=0http://siberiantimes.com/other/others/features/large-crater-appears-at-the-end-of-the-world/

earthstory:

Giant hole appears in ground in Russia

This is an 80-meter (262 feet) in diameter hole in the ground that appeared in a remote area of Russia. At present, no one knows exactly how it formed. It’s so remote that however it formed, there were no people around to see it; it is only now being investigated by a team of visiting scientists.

Head over to this post (
Video) and we’ve got video taken from a helicopter flying over the hole up now.


There are some obvious options but none of them are a perfect fit. A meteor strike does create a hole in the ground, but this doesn’t have the typical shape of a meteor crater; it seems much deeper. Volcanic craters do exist but this doesn’t seem like a volcanic area. Interactions between magma and groundwater can create explosion craters that look a lot like this, but again not sure where the Magma would be coming from in this remote area of Siberia.

Some suggestions that could make sense involve a meteor actually hitting an area where there is an open pocket of space created from previous erosion and punching through, or the one I think might be the most likely; a gas explosion.

This area is full of natural gas resources and this site is only 30 kilometers from the region’s biggest natural gas field. An explosion of natural gas, potentially being released by melting permafrost, makes sense to me, but I’ll be interested to see if there’s a final answer.

-JBB

More:
http://blog.seattlepi.com/bigscience/2014/07/16/mystery-crater-in-siberia-has-scientists-stumped-for-now/#23627101=0
http://siberiantimes.com/other/others/features/large-crater-appears-at-the-end-of-the-world/

Tourmaline (Elbaite) - Newry, Maine
American Museum of Natural History
Image by author

Tourmaline (Elbaite) - Newry, Maine

American Museum of Natural History

Image by author

Ammonite (Placenticeras intercalare)
Bearpaw Formation, Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada
75 million years old
American Museum of Natural History - NYC
Image by author

Ammonite (Placenticeras intercalare)

Bearpaw Formation, Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada

75 million years old

American Museum of Natural History - NYC

Image by author

Sudbury Impact - 1.85 Ga

Images by author