Sedimentary, My Dear Watson

A 21-year-old geology (and Spanish and history) undergrad who loves rocks and wants other people to love them too! Here you'll find a diverse collection of all things geo and natural history related, targeted at varying levels of expertise.

*Please feel free to send in geo-related questions to the ASK page!*

Specimen from American Museum of Natural History - NYC
Image by author

Specimen from American Museum of Natural History - NYC

Image by author

amnhnyc:

"Shooting stars" are actually meteors. People once thought they were stars falling from the sky. These tiny grains of dust glow brightly in Earth’s atmosphere because they’re traveling so fast that they release a tremendous amount of energy. 
Meteorites can be huge or tiny. The biggest one ever found weighs around 60 tons, while others are the size of a grain of sand. 
All meteorites come from inside our solar system. Most of them are fragments of asteroids that broke apart long ago in the asteroid belt, located between Mars and Jupiter. 
Small pieces of the Moon occasionally reach Earth as meteorites. We know where they come from because they’re identical in composition to the lunar rocks collected by Apollo astronauts. 
Certain “primitive” meteorites contain the first solid material to form in our solar system. Researchers have used the age of this material—4.568 billion years—to determine the age of our solar system.
Learn much more in the Arthur Ross Hall of Meteorites. 

amnhnyc:

  • "Shooting stars" are actually meteors. People once thought they were stars falling from the sky. These tiny grains of dust glow brightly in Earth’s atmosphere because they’re traveling so fast that they release a tremendous amount of energy. 
  • Meteorites can be huge or tiny. The biggest one ever found weighs around 60 tons, while others are the size of a grain of sand. 
  • All meteorites come from inside our solar system. Most of them are fragments of asteroids that broke apart long ago in the asteroid belt, located between Mars and Jupiter. 
  • Small pieces of the Moon occasionally reach Earth as meteorites. We know where they come from because they’re identical in composition to the lunar rocks collected by Apollo astronauts. 
  • Certain “primitive” meteorites contain the first solid material to form in our solar system. Researchers have used the age of this material—4.568 billion years—to determine the age of our solar system.

Learn much more in the Arthur Ross Hall of Meteorites

Topics in Structural Geology

I'm buying a new camera for my field work excursions but was thinking of getting something a little up market to produce some good shots for my blog. Would this be wise, or would a better camera be too bulky for the field? Do you have any suggestions?
Anonymous

I’m not so much a camera guru, since I only use my iPhone for shots in the field (and everywhere else). I like the ease and convenience of it, since I can easily and quickly tuck it into my pocket or backpack when I need to. However, the shots aren’t always superb, but I mainly use photos for observations. If you’re really into photography and want to get some great shots, then it might be worth lugging around a bit extra. (People love high-quality geo shots!) But if you’d rather not always have to think about “is my camera going to be okay? will I be able to scale this outcrop?” then maybe sticking with a less expensive or smaller model. Do any more photo-savvy geologists have their own input to include?

[My photographer friend recommends a Sony RX100 MK III for a great quality pocket-sized camera]

Topics in Structural Geology

TOURMALINE

Specimens from American Museum of Natural History - NYC

Images by author

Look what came up on my Scrabble calendar for today!

I’ve never actually seen it spelled “vugh” before, so that’s kinda interesting. Does anyone use that as their preferred spelling?

Look what came up on my Scrabble calendar for today!

I’ve never actually seen it spelled “vugh” before, so that’s kinda interesting. Does anyone use that as their preferred spelling?

Malachite and azurite appreciation post

All specimens from the American Museum of Natural History - NYC

All images by author

Topic in Structural Geology

Topics in Structural Geology